Personal behavior expectations for the rifle range

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Yes, there are Range Rules. But entwined with the written rules are expected behaviors that make everyone's range experience more pleasant, and which are observed by most seasoned range users. Some of the following have been found to be so very important to the safe and smooth running of the Range that they are part of the written Range Rules as well.

  • The Range Officer is in charge. The Range Officer bears the responsibility for keeping you and all others at the range safe. Do exactly what the Range Officer tells you to do, when you’re told to do it. Do not "interpret" what is meant, challenge, or argue about it. If you have questions: COMPLY FIRST, then ask about the rule or range command.
  • YOU are required to know and follow the Range Rules. The Range Rules are posted in a variety of forms on signs around the range. You will receive a printed copy on your first visit. There are paper copies in the range office. The Range Officer will be happy to give you a copy or copies at any time. You may also read, download and print them from this web site.
  • Clean up after yourself. If you take out sandbags etc. to use while shooting, put them back when you are finished. Clean up your spent casings when you are done. Brass cases go in the brass buckets. Steel, aluminum, and any non-brass cases go in the blue recycle bins.
  • Read the labels on the different receptacles around the range. They have been labeled to make it really simple for everyone to use:
"TRASH" = for garbage, no live rounds ever.
"PAPER AND CARDBOARD" = targets, cardboard, clean paper wrappers, no live rounds ever.
"SANDBAGS" = sandbags only, no trash, no brass, no live rounds.
"DUDS"= live rounds that didn’t fire and any live rounds that for whatever reason you do not want to keep or fire.
  • Most of the regulars here are friendly and willing to lend a helping hand to or share knowledge with anyone else out here. Sometimes you just want to shoot and don’t want to hear advice. That’s okay. Just tell them thanks, but no thanks today. (And if someone tells you the preceding, stop talking to them.) But if another shooter lets you know you’re doing something unsafe or against range rules—for example: turning your pistol sideways for any reason, or crossing other people with your muzzle for any reason—stop doing it. You can be thrown out for unsafe behavior. The firearm is always to be treated as if it’s loaded.
  • Only shoot the targets. This is a target range. You shoot at targets here. Don’t shoot at rocks on the ground, the target frames, the support posts, the trees, baffles, animals or anything but targets. You can be thrown out. *
  • If an animal is on the range, yell "cease-fire", then come get the Range Officer. Sometimes big animals like deer or bobcats wander across the range during live fire. Sometimes there’s a rabbit that just doesn’t get the danger it may be in. Sometimes the quail walk their babies up and down the 50 yard line berm. Yell "cease fire" if you see any of them, then tell the Range Master.
  • It is not legal to shoot any animal here, and it is against the Range Rules and range etiquette. No one here will appreciate it. The Range Officer will not tolerate animal cruelty, does not find it funny, and will not buy any excuses. You will never shoot here again. The Range Officer will also spread the word to the other ranges. *

* It is understood that occasionally accidents happen, and are considered normal wear and tear on the range. What some folks don't understand is that it's usually pretty easy to distinguish the accidental from the intentional.